Partners In Design

3.11.2009

Learn Snacklish!







It's been a long time since I've seen a clever campaign. Pepsi failed at rebranding with their new logo and lettering splattered all over NYC and Tropicana was quite frankly, an epic fail. Then along comes Snickers. A clever campaign that takes the iconic Snickers logo to a whole new level; leveraging its brand and logo by creating its own language: Snacklish. But not any brand can do this; Snickers is well known. Enough so, that Snickers doesn't even need to place its name on the ads....consumers just know it's Snickers. They recognize the classic Red, White and Blue Chocolately logo (American shout out anyone?). So we here at PID salute you, Snickers, (American pun intended) on a great job; you gave us hope that there are still intelligent creatives out there!



4 comments:

Alexandra said...

Amen!

Aatom said...

I couldn't disagree more about this campaign. I find it grating, remarkably unfunny considering how the concept lends itself to easy humor, and the last thing it makes me want to do is grab a Snickers. The only one I have liked so far is "Ate Avenue" on the subways, which gives the campaign a cheeky local flavor. Other than that, a room full of drunk monkeys could have come up with this campaign, and probably done better.

Monica said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Monica said...

Unfortunately those drunk monkeys were the ones working on Tropicana that horribly flopped; to the point where Tropicana pulled it's new packaging design to prevent sales from falling further. You're correct that the campaign lends itself to easy humor, but that's the beauty of it all. In a marketing atmosphere where people are bombarded with puzzles, anagrams and tricks it's refreshing when advertising goes back to basics. In the 1960s VW gained it's advertising fame with Ogilvy's very simple, yet affective "Think small" campaign. It doesn't always need to be so complicated, and you'd be amazed how difficult it is for people to think simplisticly nowadays. It's ironic.